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Tips For Working With Clients

Tips For Working With Clients

Without clients, we couldn’t make a living as editors. Clients are everything. There are good clients and there are not so good clients, just as there are good editors and not so good editors. This issue will offer tips on working with clients in a 

Why perfectionism in publishing is unrealistic

Why perfectionism in publishing is unrealistic

We’ve all read those book reviews that comment that a book needs more editing. Maybe you’ve even found an error in a book or published material yourself. But the problem with expecting perfection in a human product is there are so many problems with that 

Choosing Your Editing Niche

Choosing Your Editing Niche

An important part of your editor identity is what you choose to edit whether you are freelancer or traditionally employed. An editing niche will help focus your client list, build expertise, and guide your career. Some editors fear being limited by an editing niche. I was one of them. I’m not anymore.

There is nothing wrong with editing a wide variety of works of fiction and nonfiction, academic or legal, scientific or speculative. Many editing practices and principles can be widely applied across industries and you learn new ways of editing depending on the industry. Editing and reading widely are important for every writing and editing professional.

However, there will be one area where you either see an opportunity you would love to take, are naturally better at, or love reading more than others. From a business and personal perspective, it is better to focus on a niche.

Why? It helps focus your skills, prevents burn out, and ensures you become an expert in your field. It will keep you competitive in the editing market and focus your client search.

Not only should you be focusing on your niche field, you should also be choosing your projects and clients carefully. Learn to say no.

Does picking your niche and saying no mean you refuse all jobs outside of your niche? Not at all. As a business professional, we come across dry spells or projects we love that don’t fit in our niche. Feel free to take non-niche projects on. A niche means you are more marketable as an editor and ensures you enjoy the work you do.

How do you choose one?

Answer these questions:

What are your interests?What type of editing work or reading exhausts me more? What type seems easier or takes me less time to read or edit?What topics do you know more about or understand?What do you enjoy reading?

 

Recommended Read


Editorial Niches by Editors Canada

Editorial Niches began as part of Editing Canadian English, 3rd edition — the style manual of Editors Canada. However, to keep the print edition a manageable size and price, the sections on editorial roles and requirements (chapter 12) and editorial niches (chapter 13) have now been published as this companion volume. Whether you are a would-be, new or established editor, Editorial Niches offers a treasure trove of information by a team of seasoned editors who are experts in their field.

 

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This post was originally sent as an email to my Editing Services Newsletter email list in August 2020. If you’d like to receive emails like this, please sign up using the form in the sidebar.

Branding Yourself as an Editor

Branding Yourself as an Editor

Branding is important for three reasons 1) consistency in online presence 2) getting clients 3) keeping clients. Clients will know what to expect from you because of your branding. You’ll be able to advertise yourself to new clients using consistent and unique elements to make 

Author DIY Graphic Design – The Design Process

Author DIY Graphic Design – The Design Process

In this blog post, we’ll be looking at the design process that any project should go through. The design process is effective to find the best concept. This includes book covers, logos, marketing posters, interior formatting, etc. In this example, we’ll be looking at book 

The Magical Tales of Two Brothers by Elizabeth Bekolay and illustrated by Jennifer Lynn Becker

The Magical Tales of Two Brothers by Elizabeth Bekolay and illustrated by Jennifer Lynn Becker

Do you love books, nature, and magic? How about science and children’s stories?

Check out this Kickstarter for a really great children’s book series.

The Magical Tales of Two Brothers – Book 1: The Peatlands

“A book series of wonder and ecological accuracy to promote ecoliteracy and magical thinking for all ages, printed on recycled paper.”

Written by Elizabeth Bekolay and illustrated by Jennifer Lynn Becker.

Catherine and her colleagues will be helping to bring this book to readers.

Consider donating to one of the tiers to be sure you get your copy!

 

 

How Does an Editor Prepare to Edit Your Work?

How Does an Editor Prepare to Edit Your Work?

Editing is much more than looking at punctuation, spelling, and grammar, and even those aspects are complex. Editors have to prepare to edit a work in a number of ways including education, consultation, and making careful decisions about what and how to edit. Below are 

OK vs O.K. vs Okay vs ok – Which do I use?

OK vs O.K. vs Okay vs ok – Which do I use?

In short, they’re all acceptable. I was taught to spell out OK or ok or O.K. as its full word ‘okay’. But I wanted to question that. My favourite style guide Chicago Manual of Style (US- used in publishing, academics, and more across countries), and 

Style Manuals and Guides

Style Manuals and Guides

As an editor, a style manual is my most important tool. As a writer, a style manual helps improve my writing and ensure consistency in content.

Editors use style manuals to ensure writing and publications are consistent. Manuals or books are generalized standards for design and writing elements like punctuation, spelling, and grammar.

Guides are specialized standards specific to an organization (like a publisher) or a publication such as a document, a book, a series, or a website.

Style manuals and guides ensure the writing and design conventions, words, and quality are consistent and relevant to their audience. They may incorporate elements of branding as well.

I would venture a guess there are over one hundred style guides and manuals that are published. On top of those are all the specialized in-house style guides publishers use.

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is commonly used in published fiction, academic social sciences and arts disciplines, and creative non-fiction, especially in the US and Canada (and sometimes the UK). There are:

  • national press style guides and manuals
  • different manuals for scientific and medical texts like IEEE  which is based on CMS
  • MLA (scholarly publications)
  • APA (used for psychology and some social sciences)
  • New Oxford Style Manual (UK)
  • many editing handbooks with style conventions
  • DCITA’s style manual (AUS)
  • Greenslade’s style manual(AUS)

The list goes on and on. You can see one collected list of style manuals and guides by country here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_style_guides

An editor will have a favourite style manual, and/or will choose one or more manuals to fit your manuscript or writing project. My favourites are CMS 17th edition, New Oxford Style Manual, Canadian Press Stylebook, and Greenslade’s style manual.

If you writers want to explore these manuals to improve your writing, please do. If you are in the US and Canada, start off with CMS 17th  online or physical. If you’re in the UK go for New Oxford Style Manual, and if you’re in AUS go for Greenslade’s.

For the Story – Your Story Your Budget Editing Promotion

For the Story – Your Story Your Budget Editing Promotion

What you get: 1 round of edits for whatever your budget. What you need: a manuscript up to 200, 000 words, a story Catherine loves Catherine will take on a limited number of manuscripts to edit for the month of August and September. Pay what